Links Galore

Lots of links I’ve been saving:

Links Galore

Start the week with some good link-age:

 

Tonight’s the Night: Boston Teen Author Festival Sneak Preview!

Boston-Teen-Author-Fest-PreviewI’m so psyched to join several other awesome YA/MG authors for tonight’s special Boston Teen Author Festival sneak preview! In addition to great conversation about the literary life, you’ll have the chance to win books and other swag by showing off all your bookish trivia knowledge. Between the trivia and the cupcakes, you cannot miss this.

The details:

BTAF Sneak Preview
Cambridge Public Library Teen Room
449 Broadway, Cambridge, MA 02138
Thursday, May 7
7pm, followed by book signing

Come say hi, snag a cupcake, and win awesome book swag. See you tonight!

Links Galore

Lots of good links to start your week:

 

Links Galore

A few more spooky links for Halloween:

Moving on From Panem

My mom read The Hunger Games recently and afterward she told me, “I don’t even know what to do. What else can I read that’s like that?” I suggested The Handmaid’s Tale, which might have been a little too intense for her. (Sorry, Mom.) I should have directed her to the Lawrence Public Library’s flowchart for what to read after The Hunger Games. A sample:

Make sure to click through for the rest of their fantastic suggestions. I might take some of these recommendations to share with my YA Dystopian Society Book Club.

School for Rare Books (and the People Who Love Them)

Sometimes Alderman Library inspires silliness instead of scholarship.

This article combines three of my favorite things: books, libraries, and Charlottesville, VA. The Rare Book School, a summer program at the University of Virginia (wahoowa!), is an intensive course about the study, care, and history of the written word. How cool is that? Also cool:

And rare books aren’t just a matter of leather and fine paper. Mr. Suarez has added a number of classes about digitization and likes to begin his own course, Teaching the History of the Book, by passing around a box of Harlequins. Romance novels, he notes, are the biggest part of the publishing industry, and the part that has been most radically transformed by e-books.

“I tell my students to follow the money,” he said. “If you don’t understand the money, you don’t understand the book.”

Would love to hear the Rare Book School’s take on children’s literature. Make sure to check out the rest of the article. If you’re like me, you might be getting started on the application for next summer’s Rare Book School session.