Friday Fifteen

Happy Friday, everyone! I can’t believe it’s already the first of August. My brain is still back in June. Let’s catch up with some fifteen-word (or fewer) book reviews.

1. Molly Saves the Day (American Girls: Molly #5) by Valerie Tripp
After I read this, I asked my parents, “Have you ever heard of D-Day?”

2. Buffy the Vampire Slayer: The Long Way Home (Season 8, #1) by Joss Whedon
Only season 8 graphic novel I’ve tried. Weird to see the characters after the finale.

3. The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Vol I: The Pox Party by M.T. Anderson
Brilliant. One of the YAs I recommend to people who don’t think YA is literary.

4. Micro Fiction: An Anthology of Fifty Really Short Stories ed. by Jerome Stern
Read in a class I took on flash fiction. Some were a couple of paragraphs.

5. Tikki Tikki Tembo by Arlene Mosel
One of those books that you remember and think “Oh, that was kind of racist.”

Friday Fifteen

The past week has been super hectic, but I’m psyched to be writing today’s Friday Fifteen. Onto the micro-book-reviews! Happy weekend, everyone.

photo (5)1. The Rain Catchers by Jean Thesman
A household of women who caught rain to wash their hair. Don’t remember much else.

2. Powerful Paleo Superfoods: The Best Primal-Friendly Foods for Burning Fat, Building Muscle and Optimal Health by Heather Connell and Julia Maranan
I don’t follow Paleo, but great recipes based on real food. Hello, blackberry-glazed salmon!

3. The Ghost at Dawn’s House (The Baby-Sitters Club, #9) by Ann M. Martin
Dawn’s house has a secret passageway, making me jealous forever.

4. Daughter of Smoke & Bone by Laini Taylor 
I would have devoured this even if I didn’t read for the 48-hour book challenge.

5. Dubliners by James Joyce
Ashamed to admit that I don’t remember much of these famous stories. Should try again.

Links Galore

Lots of link-y goodness:

 

Upcoming Events: Buttonwood Books and the Boston Teen Author Festival!

A couple of new and excellent events to add to the calendar!

On Wednesday, August 13 at 7pm, I’ll be at Buttonwood Books in Cohasset, MA with fellow 2014 debut YA author (and all around delightful person) Skylar Dorset. We’ll be BrOEEmsCAAAGCN2talking about writing, being debut authors, how awesome YA is, and more.

And then on September 27, I’ll be part of the 2014 Boston Teen Author Festival at the Cambridge Public Library. Other authors on this year’s schedule include local favorites like A.C. Gaughen, Sashi Kaufman, Diana Renn, and Erin Dionne; and I might just fangirl myself into a frenzy over fellow Candlewick author M.T. Anderson.

Check out the Appearances and Interviews page for more info, and mark your calendars now!

 

Friday Fifteen

Happy Friday, everyone! It’s a beautiful Friday here, and I am so happy to be headed into the weekend. Onto the micro-book-reviews!

1. The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth
The ending made me think “This was about Cameron and her parents,” which I loved.

2. The Miserable Mill (A Series of Unfortunate Events #4) by Lemony Snicket
I honestly don’t remember much about this one. Before the VFD plot really got going.

3. Henry V by William Shakespeare
The Henrys bleed together for me. I think I need to see them performed.

4. Cars and Trucks and Things That Go by Richard Scarry
We read this one all the time when I was little. Classic Scarry goodness!

5. Linger (The Wolves of Mercy Falls, #2) by Maggie Stiefvater
Glad to be back with Grace and Sam; looking forward to the third book.

The Secret Life of a YA Writer in a Traditional MFA Program

This month at Ploughshares, I’m sharing a little of my experience at a traditional MFA program and ending up a YA writer.

I know other YA writers who went through traditional MFA programs and weren’t as happy with their experiences, but I appreciated having the time to focus on craft and technique. And I think it helped that my program was a little more flexible than most–I got to take classes outside of my genre, and also crossed over a lot with the publishing program.

Obviously you don’t need to get an MFA to be a writer or learn/practice craft. There are a million different ways to be a writer and you have to find what works for you.

Click through to read the full post, and enjoy the Lost gif.