Boston Teen Author Festival: Panels Announced!

It’s less than two weeks to the Boston Teen Author Festival and I’m so excited!

Doors open at 10:45, and we’ll be having four amazing panels. The info has just been announced! I’ll be part of Platonic in Love: Writing strong non-romantic relationships. One of my biggest pet peeves is that YA is all about insta-love, and I’m so glad to have the opportunity to talk about other kinds of love and relationships and friendships in YA with some seriously amazing authors.

Check out the poster below for all the panel/author goodness:

And click through to the Boston Teen Author Festival website for all necessary info. Hope to see you on September 27th!

Links Galore

A few links for your Wednesday:

 

 

Friday Fifteen

Happy Friday, everyone! And happy September! Summer kind of flew by and, as you may have noticed, I’ve been a slightly delinquent blogger. Part of that was working on my WIP, which I finally finished! (Well, you know, I finished the draft, but that means diving into revisions and polishing everything up.)

But another part of that is being a little burnt out by stuff like the Friday Fifteen. Even bumping it down to five reviews a week instead of fifteen has been hard over the past few months. So I’m thinking–maybe it’s time to restructure Fridays a little. I’m toying with the idea of making the Friday Fifteen a biweekly or monthly post, and mixing in other recurring threads on the other Fridays.

Let me know your thoughts in the comments. At least for today, we’ve got a regular Friday Fifteen. Onto the book reviews in fifteen words or fewer!

1. Imaginary Girls by Nova Ren Suma
Beautifully written and delightfully creepy. Another to add to my literary YA list.

2. The Carrot Seed by Ruth Krauss
Growing things takes dedication and patience. Which may be why I’m bad at gardening.

3. A House Like a Lotus by Madeleine L’Engle
Not my favorite of the L’Engles. The Athenian setting stands out for me the most.

4. The Haunted House (Sweet Valley Twins #3) by Francine Pascal
Jessica thinks the new girl is a witch, is mean to her, surprising no one.

5. Good Enough by Paula Yoo
Sweet and funny and genuine. Special place in my heart for Patti’s church youth group.

Links Galore

Man, I am so behind on posting! Here are all the links I’ve been hoarding:

Come Find Me at Buttonwood Books Tomorrow Night!

Tomorrow I’ll be at Buttonwood Books in Cohasset, MA (just outside of Boston) for a panel and signing with my fellow 2014 debut YA author the lovely Skylar Dorset!

Come for the discussion about YA writing, stay for the signing and smiles.

The details:

YA Author Panel and Signing
August 13, 7pm at Buttonwood Books
747 CJC HWY RTE 3A
Cohasset, MA 02025

The weather is supposed to be kind of gross, but hopefully by 7pm things will have calmed down. And what better way to spend a rainy day than by hitting up a local bookstore?

Friday Fifteen

Happy Friday, everyone! Time for a few book reviews in fifteen words or under. Onto the reviews!

1. Lola and the Boy Next Door by Stephanie Perkins
I want Lola’s wig collection. The family dynamic stuff was unexpected and touching.

2. Stories of Anton Chekhov Paperback by Anton Chekhov
People died, there was a dog. Read this in a really bad English class.

3. The Witch’s Eye by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor
Lynn finds Mrs. Tuggle’s glass eye, gets possessed by it. Scared me most in series.

4. Mary Anne’s Bad-Luck Mystery (The Baby-Sitters Club, #17) by Ann M. Martin
Mary Anne would totally be the person to forward all the forwards.

5. Amelia Bedelia by Peggy Parish
How did this woman not get fired all the time?

Ten Reasons Why You Should Read…Otherbound by Corinne Duyvis

Otherbound by Corinne Duyvis is book that crosses genre, juggles POVs, and deals with everything from romance to curses to questions of identity. And it all comes together beautifully, with all the feels and thoughtfulness a reader could hope for. Here are a few of my reasons why you should read Otherbound:

1. Nolan
To put it mildly, Nolan’s going through a tough time. He’s been flashing to a fantasy world whenever his eyes are shut, and to everyone around him, it looks like he’s having seizures and hallucinations. Despite the pressure he’s under in both worlds, Nolan is a sensitive person who deeply cares about other people. He’s a character you can’t help but rooting for.

2. Amara
Similarly, Amara’s under a lot of pressure (trying to keep a princess’s magical curse at bay, having Nolan live inside of her, etc.). It’s hard enough to craft one layered main character, but Corinne’s managed to create two. Amara is brave and conflicted and passionate, and easily feels like a classic fantasy heroine.

3. Identity
With two main characters merged together in one body, Corinne brings up interesting questions about what it means to truly exist and own your body, and what kind of control we have over our own lives.

4. Family
Big feels for Nolan’s family. I love that they so obviously care about Nolan and are worried about him, and want to try to help him however they can (even if they have no idea what’s really going on). Pat, Nolan’s sister, is a phenomenal minor character. (Seriously, all the feels.)

5. Big Bads
There are a couple of super creepy, intense moments. Don’t want to spoil anything here, but oh my gosh, stakes get raised on both sides of reality. And even then, I liked seeing how the ‘villains’ and challengers were developed; they were all trying to find some kind of peace, even if it came at another’s expense.

6. Signs
I took ASL in college, so I have major respect for signing as a language. It was really cool to see sign incorporated here as Amara’s method of communication, without it necessarily being a story about a signing experience.

7. Medical Alert
Nolan is dealing with seizures that take him into Amara’s world, and Corinne includes the reality of that kind of situation–the danger of having a seizure, the difficulty of trying to find medication to help, how expensive working with doctors and medications can be.

8. Chases and Escapes
Along with excellent character development and concepts of self, Otherbound includes some good old fashioned excitement. Amara and Cilla are on the run from people trying to kill them and, on yeah, there’s a deadly curse to worry about. Nolan has a hard enough time as it is in the real world without having to deal with stuff like the lines of worlds blurring.

9. Diversity
Otherbound features a wonderfully diverse cast of characters. Obviously Nolan’s dealing with seizures, but he also has a prosthetic leg and is Latino. Amara signs, and is also a WOC and loves a man and a woman (and both relationships feel genuine). None of these features become an “issue” (as in old-school after-school-special “issues”) and are instead just the way these characters exist in the world–which is how it should be.

10. Corinne Duyvis Is Probably a Superhero
If I were going to invent a superhero, it would probably be pretty much exactly like Corinne. She lives in Holland; she writes awesome books and makes awesome art; she’s extremely active in speaking out for diversity in children’s/YA literature (see Disability in Kidlit); and she currently has pink hair. I’m so glad to have gotten to know Corinne through the Fourteenery, and I’m psyched that now readers are getting to know her, too.

Otherbound is now available in all kinds of stores, so go pick it up!