The Soul of Wit

A fun look at how stylometry helps prove that Shakespeare wrote Shakespeare’s plays.

I’m always a little baffled when people try to make a big conspiracy theory around Shakespeare. (See also Truman Capote writing To Kill a Mockingbird instead of Harper Lee.) Let the dude have his work!

Also, this is good proof that a writer’s voice is a real thing. Even though Shakespeare wrote sonnets, historical dramas, fantastical comedies, and more, all his works have his particular tone and style.

Maybe you’re not Shakespeare, but you have your own writerly voice. Someone else can be writing about spooky ghosts or family dramas or adventures in space, but your voice is all your own, and that’s part of what makes everything you write unique.

Friday Fifteen

Somehow it’s already Friday? Not that I’m complaining, but it kind of snuck up on me. Here’s to a weekend of keeping warm and reading lots of books! To start us off, a look at what I’ve been reading and writing in fifteen words or under.

ReadingBreathe, Annie, Breathe by Miranda Kenneally
Quiet, touching; I didn’t want to leave these characters behind. Also appreciated the summery feeling.

Writing: “Just wrap my body in this blanket and give me a proper burial at sea.”
Loving my melodramatic WIP character.

Friday Fifteen

This was a short week thanks to a couple of snow days, and I am still so relieved to see Friday. Let’s go into the weekend with a look at what I’ve been reading and writing, in fifteen words or under.

ReadingThe Boy in the Black Suit by Jason Reynolds
Touching and gentle and real. First time I teared up at a list of recipes.

Writing: “It made me want to punch Thomas Jefferson for agreeing to the Louisiana Purchase.”
Really enjoying the voice of one of my WIP protagonists.

Happy almost Valentine’s Day, everyone!

Links Galore

Lots of good links to start the week:

Friday Fifteen

Happy Friday, everyone! It’s like -20 outside with the windchill, and more snow is on the way for the Boston area, so I think this is going to be a great weekend to stay inside with a stack of books. Here’s a look at what I’ve been reading and writing, in fifteen words or fewer:

Reading: Gabi, a Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero
Funny and honest and heartfelt and real, and now a Morris winner!

Writing: “With each chapter and every word, I’m increasing my capacity for sympathy and survival.”
This month at Ploughshares, I’m talking about surviving, reading, and making dioramas. Check it out here!

Happy weekending!

Upcoming Event: YA Panel at the Blue Bunny on March 14th!

Two cool things about living in Massachusetts: lots of awesome bookstores and a great community of YA and children’s writers and readers. These two things come together next month, when I join some favorite local YA authors for a panel at the Blue Bunny Bookstore in Dedham, MA. The details:

Young Adult Author Panel Discussion and Book Signing
Saturday March 14th, 3 p.m.
The Blue Bunny Books & Toys

577 High St, Dedham, Massachusetts 02026
Join YA authors Cara Bertrand, Kim Harrington, Annie Cardi, AC Gaughen, and Gina Damico for a panel discussion, Q&A, and some tasty treats.

I’m so excited to be part of such a great group. Plus, it’s March 14th, aka 3/14, aka Pi Day, so there may even be celebratory pie. What more could you want?

And since it’s an event at the Blue Bunny, that’s an excuse to share a bunny gif, right?

Hope to see you all next month!

 

A Round of Applause for Children’s Books at the ALA Youth Media Awards

On Monday, the ALA Youth Media Awards were announced at ALA’s Midwinter Meeting. That’s right, the biggies: the Newbery, the Printz, the Caldecott, and more. That means that on a Monday morning, the YA and children’s literature world was like this:

Coming about twelve hours after the Super Bowl, the ALA awards have a little less fanfare. (Although I would fully support an ALA halftime show.) But the thing I love about the ALA awards is that when you watch the livestream or follow along with the hashtag on Twitter, everyone is cheering and supportive. It doesn’t matter what publishing house you work for, or if you’re a teen librarian or doing baby story time, or if you write YA or children’s nonfiction or if you illustrate picture books. Everyone comes together to not only honor some fantastic books from the past year, but also to recognize the hard work that goes into creating these books and the hard work that goes into getting these books into the hands of young readers who need them.

There are a lot of phenomenal books, and only a few can get awarded/honored every year. But every year it’s awesome to see librarians and writers and illustrators and publishers and readers come together and celebrate books for young readers.

Check out the recorded livestream and the full list of winners here. Three cheers for another year of books!