Hearts on a String

Happy Valentine’s Day, everybody! I know it’s not a happy holiday for everyone, but I think it should be. Valentine’s Day is a chance to share all kinds of love–love for your friends, love for your family, love for your partner, etc. And you can do things your own way. Bake cookies, play board games, put on music and dance like crazy, go to a basketball game, curl up with a favorite collection of short stories–whatever you and your favorites like to do.

In case you’re still looking for ways to share your love, I suggest checking out these adorable bookish Valentine’s Day crafts. My favorite:

valentines-day-heart-garland

This garland would be fun to keep up year-round.

Hope you’re all having a great Valentine’s Day. Cool plans with loved ones? Share in the comments!

(image: Book Riot)

Follow Your Characters

At writing group last weekend, my critique partners mentioned they liked my latest project but were wondering where it was going, exactly. “Me too!” I said (in more or less words). I know a lot of writers who like to outline everything and map out exactly where their characters are going, but that doesn’t really work for me. I’m more of a “write-by-the-seat-of-my-pants” kind of writer–I have a vague idea of where I’m going, but I don’t have a strict outline and write toward where the characters feel like they should be going. Which sometimes makes it difficult to create a real plot.

So of course I was psyched to see this hilarious comic from Jane Yolen and Mike Cavallaro about creating plot.

Make sure to click through for the rest. I especially like Yolen’s comment at the end: ““There are two kinds of writers—the ones who figure out a plot ahead of time before writing, and the ones who set their characters in motion and then run after them saying, “Hey. . .wait for me.”” The latter is definitely more like me. And it might take a little while to figure out exactly what’s going on and how it should all come together, but there’s something exciting about chasing after your characters and learning about what’s important to them.

Okay, in case you’re a pants-er like me and do want some plot guidance, here are some great suggestions for laying out a basic plot map.

(image: Mike Cavallaro and Jane Yolen, via Figment) (H/T Lauren M Barrett)

http://lizwritesbooks.com/2012/05/the-7-point-plot-system-aka-save-the-cat-for-pantsers/

A Room of One’s Own

Artist Julia Callon’s Houses of Fiction project is freaking awesome. She’s designed dioramas inspired by famous female characters in classic literature. Each diorama has two images–one representing the “passive, subservient woman” and the other representing the “madness”–in order to reflect the conflicting ideas of womanhood in these novels. I especially like her take on The Yellow Wallpaper:

Make sure to check out the full set of photographs on Callon’s website.

(image: Julia Callon)(via The Atlantic)

Hedgehogs, Assemble!

Reason #92 why the Brookline Library and its teen librarians/patrons are awesome: Avenger Book Hedgehogs.

It’s like everything I love in one place! And Thor has a hammer! *dies of cuteness*

A little about the project:

“Specially appearing at tonight’s lock-in event for our teen manga/anime club, and then on to a display in the Brookline Library: Marvel’s Avengers!  These hedgehogs, made of repurposed books (drawn from our discarded but well-loved to the point of falling apart comics and paperbacks – no worries, replacements have already hit the shelves!), are decked out in full Avengers gear made by yours truly from duct tape.  Powered by craftiness and geek passion.”

Craftiness and geek passion can do anything. If you want to make your own book hedgehogs (superhero or otherwise), check out the tutorial here.

The library also hosted a hedgehog book-making event for Halloween. Can teen Annie time travel to the Brookline Library and get to do awesome stuff like this?